Baseball91's Weblog

February 3, 2016

Concerning Bulk Surveillance & Video Policing

Filed under: Law,Minnesota,Uncategorized — baseball91 @ 12:50 AM
Tags: , , , ,

Each American household seemed to have an ability to freeze time, with cameras and camcorders. And in a sense there has been a loss of spontaneity, a loss of freshness in the Information Age, if you have listened to the Grammy Award-nominated songs in the recent years.

batman

Bulk surveillance program. Time, frozen. In a sense, freezed time is what newspapers did each day, explaining what is in a series of events, near and far away, though news rooms these days are staffed by less than fifty percent the number of professionals that were there ten years ago.

Police investigations were the next to be cut back. In early 2016, police will begin asking local camera owners to join “a network” to provide ‘critical” video evidence, after the Rochester City Council on November 18, 2015 approved an annual $16,749 contract for the SecuroNet software program, according to the Rochester Post Bulletin. SecuroNet Founder Justin Williams and Accounts Director Gregory Boosalis were in Rochester the following day to demonstrate their software program which links access by Rochester Police to private businesses and residences with existing security cameras part of the bulk surveillance of their SecuroNet system.

In The SecuroNet system, when does a third party contractor become part of the public sector? Expected to go live early in 2016, who can view the collected video, logged as evidence and kept, according to Minnesota law, from public review? With a contract in place with SecuroNet Founder Justin Williams and accounts director Gregory Boosalis, the Rochester police department had some internal steps to take before SecuroNet system would be ready to accept participants, before police begin asking local camera owners to join the bulk surveillance network, Captain John Sherwin said.

Surveillance programs: As part of this new investigative response for Rochester, Founder Justin Williams mentioned The SecuroNet program is voluntary! Doesn’t this idea of selling cybersecurity sound suspiciously like a protection racket.

“With that existing camera infrastructure in place” – adding video policing to the standard procedure for the Rochester police – “it’s something that we want to tap into even more and we feel that this is the tool that can help us do that,” Captain John Sherwin said about the bulk surveillance program, according to the Rochester Post Bulletin.

With the software rights retained – like in the case of my computer, with the Internet Service Provider and the municipality that installed the broadband, and now SecuroNet Founder Justin Williams – who does the SecuroNet system video belong? With their hand in at least hyping and most likely launching the SecuroNet network, who do these cameras now belong?  Why is SecuroNet Founder getting an annual $16,749 contract out of the private cameras in the community? Are these more of the things that members of the public seldom think about, when 61 private sector security cameras become part of a public network? The Fifth Amendment provides the right not to self-incriminate, but what of the computer installations in the operation in the 2016 model vehicle? What of the private camera on my property, once a business volunteers to join the network tied to the SecuroNet founder as well as the public sector? Will I get prosecuted for something that happens on my own property that incriminates the owner of the camera/tape?

On matters of public policy, the Rochester police seem interested in reducing the number of jobs, like corporations cut back the jobs of real people, with dreams of a real-time crime center, in the coming age of drones.

“Video collected by police through the SecuroNet system would be logged as evidence and be, according to Minnesota law, kept from public review until the criminal case had been closed,” Captain John Sherwin of the Rochester Police Department told the Rochester newspaper about the impersonal and confidential video files. “Quite frankly, many of our cases are solved through video evidence, and … based on private sector video,” Captain John Sherwin of the Rochester Police Department told the Rochester newspaper.

Beware the security experts, capitalizing on the fears attached in a free society, with freedom of the press, free speech, and freedom of religion! The proprietary software is poised to collect annual fees, as the world gets less personal – in the coming age of, the less human age of, drones – and the intensity of hate will increase between police and civilians. As government infringes more and more upon my privacy, a strong partnership between the private sector and the police is the most efficient way to address this growing threat of the Bogey Man?

The foot that you shoot, in your private parking lot, might be your own. On the seamy side when the police solicit your video tapes, does it feel like extortion? You will be kept on an enemies’ list – the opposite of the Better Business Bureau? – if you refuse? Would SecuroNet be asking me to donate my hunting rifles to the police, next? And should you refuse, the police will respond more slowly to a break-in? PLACE can be one day either be used against you, or claim you, based upon current events, like what happened with the passage of law called The PATRIOT ACT. Wasn’t this software program from the private sector unnecessarily separating in the public arena, on some kind of litmus test for patriots, those leery of a police state from those old-fashioned vigilantes?

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2 Comments »

  1. Hear the historic background about spying in 1976. When Congress tackled the issue under the leadership of Senator Frank Church.
    http://www.c-span.org/video/?326284-1/walter-mondale-gary-hart-strengthening-intelligence-oversight

    “To build a state-of-the-art surveillance facility, the Los Angeles Police Department cast an acquisitive eye on software being developed by Palantir, a startup funded in part by the Central Intelligence Agency’s venture capital arm. Originally designed for spy agencies, Palantir’s technology allowed users to track individuals with unprecedented reach, connecting information from conventional sources like crime reports with more controversial data gathered by surveillance cameras and license plate readers that automatically, and indiscriminately, photographed passing cars.

    The LAPD could have used a small portion of its multibillion-dollar annual budget to purchase the software, but that would have meant going through a year-long process requiring public meetings, approval from the City Council, and, in some cases, competitive bidding.”

    Instead, the LAPD targeted private donations from sources like IBM and Target.” –writes Ali Winston and Darwin Bond Graham, for MinnPost
    https://www.minnpost.com/propublica/2014/10/private-donors-including-target-and-ibm-supply-spy-gear-cops

    Comment by baseball91 — February 3, 2016 @ 1:37 AM | Reply

  2. mm

    In the United States, spying seems okay, for now. Is my basic fear about those who do not care about the basic liberties? The fear of the majority is such only when they do not get a dial tone, outside the range of a cell tower? With so little fear until Donald Trump would be elected.

    https://www.minnpost.com/politics-policy/2016/07/say-cheese-here-s-where-police-surveillance-cameras-are-located-minneapolis-

    http://blogs.mprnews.org/newscut/2016/04/spy-planes-overhead-still-keeping-an-eye-on-minneapolis-why/

    http://www.mprnews.org/story/2016/04/16/npr-your-conversation-on-the-bus-or-train-may-be-recorded

    Comment by baseball91 — April 8, 2016 @ 1:26 PM | Reply


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